An ode to phytoplankton

burblings:

Diatoms have lacy cases
Of material silicaceous,
Perforated lids and bases
Made to fit like Petri dishes.
Nursed on Nature’s hydroponic
They’re prolific and nutritious,
Making bouillabase planktonic
For the sustenance of fishes.

- Ralph LewinTaken from ‘The Fertile Sea’, by A.P Orr and S.M Marshall (1969)

28 notes

mabelmoments:


This may look like Salvador Dali’s Mae West Lips Sofa, but it is a colourised scanning electron microscope image of a diatom - a tiny single-celled marine creature invisible to the naked eye. Diatoms are a type of algae or phytoplankton that typically measure just 0.002 inches across, and are thought to pre-date the dinosaurs. Oceanographer Dr Paul Hargreaves uses an electron microscope to photograph the creatures, and artist Faye Darling uses digital paint programmes to colourise them.

Electron microscope images of diatoms by Dr Paul Hargreaves and Faye Darling

mabelmoments:

This may look like Salvador Dali’s Mae West Lips Sofa, but it is a colourised scanning electron microscope image of a diatom - a tiny single-celled marine creature invisible to the naked eye. Diatoms are a type of algae or phytoplankton that typically measure just 0.002 inches across, and are thought to pre-date the dinosaurs. Oceanographer Dr Paul Hargreaves uses an electron microscope to photograph the creatures, and artist Faye Darling uses digital paint programmes to colourise them.

Electron microscope images of diatoms by Dr Paul Hargreaves and Faye Darling

187 notes

ohscience:

fossil marine diatom, actinoptychus heliopelta, 900x

ohscience:

fossil marine diatom, actinoptychus heliopelta, 900x

122 notes

wornwit:

Red tide in Xiamen, in China’s Fujian Province, April 21, 2007.
Red tides are nutrient-fueled blooms of phytoplankton (often dinoflagellates) that discolor water with their pigments. Several species are known to have toxic effects on marine life and pose a risk to human health through the consumption of exposed shellfish. 

wornwit:

Red tide in Xiamen, in China’s Fujian Province, April 21, 2007.

Red tides are nutrient-fueled blooms of phytoplankton (often dinoflagellates) that discolor water with their pigments. Several species are known to have toxic effects on marine life and pose a risk to human health through the consumption of exposed shellfish. 

1 note

ohscience:

freshwater phytoplankton, mainly diatoms and dinoflagellates from lake chuzenji in japan

ohscience:

freshwater phytoplankton, mainly diatoms and dinoflagellates from lake chuzenji in japan

103 notes

wornwit:

Phytoplankton blooms in the contential shelf on the coast of Florida. 

wornwit:

Phytoplankton blooms in the contential shelf on the coast of Florida. 

9 notes

Scanning electron micrograph of the phytoplankton (plant plankton) Chrysococcus sculptus, showing a Chrysophyte statocyst (resting stage in lifecycle) taken from a lake affected by the 1980 Mt. St. Helens eruption. Mag: X 34,300.

Scanning electron micrograph of the phytoplankton (plant plankton) Chrysococcus sculptus, showing a Chrysophyte statocyst (resting stage in lifecycle) taken from a lake affected by the 1980 Mt. St. Helens eruption. Mag: X 34,300.

10 notes